June 20, 2018 – American Eagle Day

Photo from the Gulkana Wild and Scenic River in Alaska by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management – Alaska (@mypubliclands).

Today, June 20, 2018 is the day America celebrates its national bird, the bald eagle, for American Eagle Day. On June 20, 1782, the bald eagle was placed at the center of the Great Seal of the United States and remains an inspiring symbol of our country. After a dramatic recovery, following the banning of DDT, bald eagles are now found in every state but Hawaii, soaring high and inspiring the nation.

For more on the fight to get rid of DDT, go to Banning DDT.

The following is reprinted from the WDNR Weekly On-Line News, dated April 10, 2018:

Celebrate eagles’ comeback by buying a license plate to fund the next conservation success

Eagle plate - Photo credit: DNR
Wisconsin residents can celebrate the continuing comeback of bald eagles and help fund the next conservation success by buying a bald eagle license plate.

Wisconsin residents can celebrate the continuing comeback of bald eagles and help fund the next conservation success by buying a bald eagle license plate. License plate sales and donations to the Endangered Resources Fund account for 25 percent of funding for work by DNR’s Natural Heritage Conservation staff with endangered species and natural areas.

Learn more about Endangered Resources Fund and the on-the-ground conservation work it supports at dnr.wi.gov, keywords “Endangered Resources Fund.”

WCHF Induction Ceremony Rescheduled – May 5, 2018

Good News!

The Wisconsin Conservation Hall of Fame’s (WCHF) 2018 Induction Ceremony for Roy and Charlotte Lukes, George Meyer and Arlie Schorger has been rescheduled for the afternoon of May 5, 2018. Dinner will follow at the Atrium at SentryWorld in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Here are the specifics:

Date: May 5, 2018

Place: The Atrium at SentryWorld, 601 Michigan Ave N, Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Schedule (afternoon event):

12:30  pm   Social Reception and Registration (Free) 

2:00 pm      Induction Ceremony (Free)

4:30 pm      Dinner ($25). Please purchase tickets or confirm use of April 14th Tickets.

Are Reservations Needed?    (Public is Invited)

Social Reception: No Reservations needed. Simply attend and enjoy!

Ceremony: No Reservations needed. Simply attend and enjoy!

Dinner: Tickets ($25). Reservations required. 

How to Purchase or Confirm Dinner Tickets (Eventbrite tickets from April 14th can be used for May 5th Dinner; just confirm if you plan to attend):

Order dinner tickets through Eventbrite.

Or confirm use of April 14th luncheon tickets by April 27th by contacting one of the following Event Organizers.

Joe Passineau,  WCHF President:  715-677-4047  jpassine@uwsp.edu 

Wisconsin Wildlife Federation:  608-635-0600  office@wiwf.org

Door County: Charlotte Lukes 920-823-2478, Tim Stone 920-839-2140 or Roy Thilly 920-839-2503

Hope you can join us for the celebration!

See poster.

See also Roy & Charlotte Lukes 2018 WCHF Inductees.

 

New Idea to Save Birds from Tall Objects

As part of research conducted by Auburn University, trainers and a veterinarian are trying to develop radar and visual systems to help stop birds from striking wind turbines. In one experiment, researcher Jason Roadman and veterinarian Seth Oster release a Bald Eagle from a lift to track how it flies toward turbines. The work is being done with U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Photo: Dennis Schroeder and John de la Rosa/NREL/Flickr CC (BY-NC-ND 2.0)

 

According to the USGS, wind turbines collisions kill between a quarter to a half million birds annually. Researchers from the College of William and Mary, however, have built a warning system they call the Acoustic Lighthouse. This invention emits a high-pitched sound which warns birds to look ahead and slow down or stop before they impact with the wind turbine. This device could be used on tall buildings and other towers like those used for storm warnings and cell phones.

Geeese taking off from Horicon pond in spring. Photo by Jack Bartholmai

I for one would be grateful to have these devices placed on the 86 wind turbines that stand just two miles from the 11,091 acres that make up Horicon Marsh here in Wisconsin.

See also Save the Eagles International